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TOPIC X: INFRASTRUCTURE FOR PEOPLE BIKING & WALKING

Bike Sharing

The Benchmarking Report began reporting on bikeshare systems in the 2012 edition. In 2012, there were 5 large cities reporting that they had a bikeshare system. Since then, bikeshare systems have become near ubiquitous with all but two large cities having a bikeshare system or having one preparing to launch.

Private dock-less bikeshare systems that have proliferated in recent years, from providers such as Lime, Ofo, Spin, and others were not reviewed for the Benchmarking Report. The survey questions of the Benchmarking Report reflect public participation in most systems where a city reported data.

FIGURE 3.10.1A – BIKE SHARING, LARGE CITIES

Legend: Red = No bike share system reported as launched in community or only private dockless system(s) reported

Footnote 91

FIGURE 3.10.1B – BIKE SHARING, SMALL OR MID-SIZED CITIES

Legend: Red = No bike share system reported as launched in community or only private dockless system(s) reported

Footnote 92

In 2014, the North American Bikeshare Association (NABSA) was incorporated and it hired its first Executive Director in 2017. NABSA currently has over 70 members, including members outside of North America. According to NABSA, there were over 50,000 bikeshare bikes in the United States in 2016 and 28 million trips were taken on bike share bikes in 2016. 93

Reported Bicycle & Pedestrian Infrastructure

FIGURE 3.10.2A – REPORTED BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN INFRASTRUCTURE, LARGE CITIES

Legend: Green =5 highest values; Red = 5 lowest values

Footnote 94

FIGURE 3.10.2B – REPORTED BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN INFRASTRUCTURE, SMALL OR MID-SIZED CITIES

Legend: Green =5 highest values; Red = 5 lowest values

Footnote 95

Bicycle and Pedestrian infrastructure are very important to the safety and comfort of people who bike and walk but has been difficult to track over time in the Benchmarking Report. Cities can and do have different ways of tracking infrastructure data, and over time the Benchmarking Report data has also reflected those differences. One source of inconsistency is whether miles of  infrastructure are reported as lane miles (meaning a street with sidewalks on both sides would count for twice the length of the street) or centerline miles (meaning a street with sidewalks on both sides would only count for the length of the street).

Pedestrian infrastructure, in the form of sidewalks, was significantly less reported than bicycle infrastructure. Miles of sidewalks was not reported in nearly half of large cities (23 out of 50) and  about a third of the other cities reviewed for the Benchmarking Report (6 out of 19). Where it was reported, it was often much more common on an absolute and per square mile basis than bicycle infrastructure.

91

The League of American Bicyclists. Bicycle Friendly Community Survey data from question B21 and alternate minimum survey questions 19 and 20. Alliance for Biking and Walking. Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2016 Benchmarking Report. Available at https://bikeleague.org/sites/default/ files/2016BenchmarkingReport_web.pdf. The most recent year reported to either survey was used for this chart and is identified in the Appendix for each city. If survey data did not provide system name, then system name was obtained from public website listed in Appendix.

92

The League of American Bicyclists. Bicycle Friendly Community Survey data from question B21 and alternate minimum survey questions 19 and 20. Alliance for Biking and Walking. Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2016 Benchmarking Report. Available at https://bikeleague.org/sites/default/ files/2016BenchmarkingReport_web.pdf. The most recent year reported to either survey was used for this chart and is identified in the Appendix for each city. If survey data did not provide system name, then system name was obtained from public website listed in Appendix.

93

North American Bikeshare Association. Media Kit. Available at https://nabsa.net/media-kit/.

94

The League of American Bicyclists. Bicycle Friendly Community Survey data from questions B14 and B16 and BMR Supplemental question BMR1. Alliance for Biking and Walking. Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2016 Benchmarking Report. Available at https://bikeleague.org/sites/default/ files/2016BenchmarkingReport_web.pdf. The most recent year reported to either survey was used for this chart and is identified in the Appendix for each city. U.S. Census Bureau. 2010 Decennial Census. 2010 Census Urban and Rural Classification and Urban Area Criteria. Available at https://www.census. gov/geo/reference/ua/urban-rural-2010.html. U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey Table B01003 5-year estimate (2016). Available at https:// factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml

95

The League of American Bicyclists. Bicycle Friendly Community Survey data from questions B14 and B16 and BMR Supplemental question BMR1. Alliance for Biking and Walking. Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2016 Benchmarking Report. Available at https://bikeleague.org/sites/default/ files/2016BenchmarkingReport_web.pdf. The most recent year reported to either survey was used for this chart and is identified in the Appendix for each city. U.S. Census Bureau. 2010 Decennial Census. 2010 Census Urban and Rural Classification and Urban Area Criteria. Available at https://www.census. gov/geo/reference/ua/urban-rural-2010.html. U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey Table B01003 5-year estimate (2016). Available at https:// factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml