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TOPIC IX: FUNDING FOR BIKING & WALKING

Amount of Federal Funds Obligated to Bicycling & Walking

FIGURE 2.9.1 – AMOUNT OF FEDERAL FUNDS OBLIGATED TO BICYCLING & WALKING

Footnote 73

Percentage of Federal Funds Obligated to Bicycling & Walking

FIGURE 2.9.2 – PERCENTAGE OF FEDERAL FUNDS OBLIGATED TO BICYCLING & WALKING

Footnote 74

Federal Safety Funding for Bicyclist & Pedestrian Safety

FIGURE 2.9.3 – FEDERAL SAFETY FUNDING FOR BICYCLIST & PEDESTRIAN SAFETY

Footnotes 75 76 77 78

Note regarding Figure 2.9.3: The Highway Safety Improvement Program provides roughly $2 billion each year for projects that will lead to a “significant reduction in traffic fatalities and serious injuries” using a “data-driven, strategic approach.” The funding for bicycle and pedestrian projects from HSIP between 2011 and 2016 represents less than 1% of the funding that was available through the HSIP program despite bicyclist and pedestrian fatalities representing roughly 15% of all traffic fatalities during that time. Between 2011 and 2016, bicyclist and pedestrian fatalities increased their share of all traffic fatalities by 2.5 percentage points.

Funding eligibility under 23 USC 405h is determined  by the percentage of traffic fatalities that are bicyclists or pedestrians in the prior year. States that have bicyclists and pedestrians representing more than 15% of all traffic fatalities in the state are eligible for 405h grants.

Reported State Funding for Bicycling & Walking

FIGURE 2.9.4 – REPORTED STATE FUNDING FOR BICYCLING & WALKING

Footnotes 79 80 81 82 83 84

State Constitution Transportation Funding Limitations & State-Authorized Local Transportation Funding Options

FIGURE 2.9.5 – STATE CONSTITUTION TRANSPORTATION FUNDING LIMITATIONS & STATE-AUTHORIZED LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUNDING OPTIONS

Footnotes 85 86

Note: “Constitutional Limitations on Use of Funding from Gas Tax” may or may not mean those limitations do not allow bicycle or pedestrian infrastructure to be funded by a state gas tax. For example, Kansas allows counties, cities, and townships to direct up to 10% of their gas tax funds to footpaths and bicycle paths. 87

73

Federal Highway Administration. Fiscal Management Information System Data (2011-2016).

74

Federal Highway Administration. Fiscal Management Information System Data (2011-2016).

75

See Figure 2.7.4 for fatality data.

76

Federal Highway Administration. Fiscal Management Information System Data (2011-2016).

77

Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA). FY2017 Highway Safety Funding. Available at https://ghsa.org/sites/default/files/2017-07/StateFunding_FY2017_1.pdf.

78

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. FY 2018 State Grant Determinations. Available at https://www.nhtsa.gov/highway-safety-grants-program/fy-2018-grant-funding-table

79

Federal Highway Administration. “FAST Act” Fact Sheet on Highway Safety Improvement Program. Available at https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/fastact/factsheets/hsipfs.cfm.

80

See Chapter IV: Show Your Section I: Nation. Figures 1.4.2 and 1.4.6.

81

The League of American Bicyclists. 2015 Bicycle Friendly State survey data from question 44.

82

The League of American Bicyclists. 2017 Bicycle Friendly State survey data from question IF14.

83

The League of American Bicyclists. 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2017 Bicycle Friendly State survey data from questions 44a (2013-15) and IF13 (2017).

84

U.S. Census Bureau. 2010 Decennial Census. 2010 Census Urban and Rural Classification and Urban Area Criteria. Available at https://www.census. gov/geo/reference/ua/urban-rural-2010.html. U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey Table B01003 5-year estimate (2016). Available at https://factfinder.census.gov/ faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml. The League of American Bicyclists. 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2017 Bicycle Friendly State survey data from questions 44a (2013-15) and IF13 (2017).

85

National Conference of State Legislatures and AASHTO Center for Excellence in Project Finance. Transportation Governance and Finance: A 50-State Review of State Legislatures and Departments of Transportation (May 2011). Available at http://www.transportation-finance.org/pdf/50_State_ Review_State_Legislatures_Departments_Transportation.pdf.

86

National League of Cities. Paying for local infrastructure in a new era of federalism (2016). Available at https://nlc.org/sites/default/files/2016-12/NLC_2016_Infrastructure_Report.pdf.

87

Robert Puentes and Ryan Prince. Brookings (2003). Fueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax. Available at http://citeseerx.ist.psu. edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.617.8007&rep=rep1&type=pdf.